Lagrange's Four-Square Theorem

Time Limit : 8 sec, Memory Limit : 65536 KB

Problem B: Lagrange's Four-Square Theorem

The fact that any positive integer has a representation as the sum of at most four positive squares (i.e. squares of positive integers) is known as Lagrangefs Four-Square Theorem. The first published proof of the theorem was given by Joseph-Louis Lagrange in 1770. Your mission however is not to explain the original proof nor to discover a new proof but to show that the theorem holds for some specific numbers by counting how many such possible representations there are.

For a given positive integer n, you should report the number of all representations of n as the sum of at most four positive squares. The order of addition does not matter, e.g. you should consider 42 + 32 and 32 + 42 are the same representation.

For example, letfs check the case of 25. This integer has just three representations 12 +22 +22 +42 , 32 + 42 , and 52 . Thus you should report 3 in this case. Be careful not to count 42 + 32 and 32 + 42 separately.

Input

The input is composed of at most 255 lines, each containing a single positive integer less than 215 , followed by a line containing a single zero. The last line is not a part of the input data.

Output

The output should be composed of lines, each containing a single integer. No other characters should appear in the output.

The output integer corresponding to the input integer n is the number of all representations of n as the sum of at most four positive squares.

Sample Input

1
25
2003
211
20007
0

Output for the Sample Input

1
3
48
7
738

Source: ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest , Asia Regional Aizu, Aizu, Japan, 2003-11-02
http://web-ext.u-aizu.ac.jp/conference/ACM/